7th Annual Student Review Contest

Introduction

Do you like sharing your opinion with others? Do you have strong critiques and reactions to books, movies, restaurants or fashion? Are you a foodie or a gamer? A music buff or a theater aficionado?

If so, this contest is for you. The New York Times invites you to play critic and write an original review for their Seventh Annual Student Review Contest.


Rules


  • Review something that fits into one of the categories of creative expression that The New York Times reviews: architecture, art, books, comedy, dance, fashion, hotels, movies, music, podcasts, restaurants, technology, theater, TV shows, video games (Please note that The Times no longer reviews video games, but they still allow the category for this contest.)

  • The review must be 450 words or fewer, not including the title.

  • Whatever you choose to review, it should be new to you and you should experience it yourself.

  • Your essay should be original for this contest, meaning, it should not already be published at the time of submission, whether in a school newspaper, for another contest or anywhere else.

  • Keep in mind that the work you send in should be appropriate for a Times audience — that is, something that could be published in a family newspaper (so, please, no curse words).

  • Submit only one entry per student.

  • While many of their contests allow students to work in teams, for this one you must work alone.


Your can read more rules by clicking HERE.


Prizes


Having your work published on The Learning Network and being eligible to be chosen to have your work published in the print New York Times.



Henry Hsiao and Elizabeth Phelps, winners of our 2019 Student Review Contest, share their reflections and review-writing advice.


Click HERE to download the contest poster to share with your friends.


You may also find more resources by clicking HERE.

Registration

The registration is free.

You must be a student ages 11 to 19 in middle school or high school anywhere in the world to participate. For students in the United States, they consider middle school to begin in 6th grade. Students in lower grades cannot participate. For students outside the United States, students must be 11 years old to have their work submitted to this contest.

Students ages 13 to 19 years old in the United States and the United Kingdom, and students ages 16 to 19 years old anywhere else in the world, can submit their own entries. Younger students can have an adult submit on their behalf.

Open an account and finish your registration now.

Schedule